Mr. Emmanuel Marte

Email: computers@stcolumbaschool.org


Personal Profile

I have been the Computer Science Education teacher at St. Columba Catholic School since year 2000. My experience with computing started in the early years of computer desktop publishing when I was a business journalist/editor back in the Philippines.  At the same time I traveled the countryside teaching journalism and desktop publishing to high school students. Most importantly, I helped them establish their own school newsletters.

Before coming to St. Columba, I worked at a Catholic grade school in Los Angeles as the 7th grade homeroom teacher. There, I also established a modern computer lab.

I came to St. Columba with the goal of instructing and training our students with the computing tools and skills necessary for the 21st century. While instruction has been based on the diocesan curriculum and guidelines, much of the lessons have evolved considerably.

Important News

St. Columba Kindergartners Now Have Coding Classes!!

(updated 04.04.17)

Kindergartners at St. Columba Catholic School are now taking Coding Classes through Code.org®! Students were excited learners and look forward to the next lessons.

St. Columba Catholic School is Now a Proud Member of the Code.org® Community!

(updated 02.23.17)

We are happy to announce that St. Columba is one of the few schools in San Diego that has adopted the coding instruction of Code.org®

“Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented minorities. Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science, just like biology, chemistry or algebra. Code.org provides the leading curriculum for K-12 computer science in the largest school districts in the United States.”

Coding class sessions have been added to the school computer science curriculum from 1st grade  through 8th grade. We are delighted to report that the vast majority of students are very enthused with the coding class sessions.

2nd Graders completing Course 1 of Coding.org lessons

2nd Graders doing Keyboarding exercises prior to their much-awaited coding class session

Kindergarten students keyboarding exercise prior to main lessons on graphics and word processing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below are the links for each grade level. Students may continue to do their COURSES or the HOUR OF CODE exercises at home.     They very much know how to access their account through their assigned ‘secret picture’.

Grade 1: https://studio.code.org/sections/GXQRZD

Grade 2: https://studio.code.org/sections/DVGMNT

Grade 3: https://studio.code.org/sections/PJMTQC

Grade 4: https://studio.code.org/sections/NZBTBH

Grade 5: https://studio.code.org/sections/LZSTBN

Grade 6: https://studio.code.org/sections/JNWLNJ

Grade 7: https://studio.code.org/sections/PWDKWW

Grade 8: https://studio.code.org/sections/TCBZHD

New Study Finds Hour of Code Makes Big Difference for Students, Particularly Girls

(updated 02.23.17)
“Since it began in 2013, Hour of Code has been promoted as an event that can change a young person’s life by exposing him or her to the wonders of computing even if only for 60 minutes.

But is Hour of Code really an effective tool with lasting benefits?

Code.org has produced a new study that attempts to answer this question.

The study entitled, “The Hour of Code: Impact on Attitudes Towards and Self-Efficacy with Computer Science” is based on data collected through a survey of students during Computer Science Education Week last December.

It found that the activity may positively change students’ attitudes about computer science and increase their feelings of self-efficacy where the subject is concerned, and these benefits were most pronounced among girls, a key demographic for the organization because women are underrepresented in the field.

For example, after completing Hour of Code, 75 percent of high school girls surveyed with no previous computer science experience said they liked the subject. That’s up from 55 percent prior to the activity.”

 

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2017/02/new_study_finds_power_behind_h.html?_ga=1.16016368.73097259.1459180298